Articles

L’Oréal Girls in Science Event

Emma works with approximately 20-50 species of extreme corals, accounting for only a small number of the 500+ species in the GBR. So these alone cannot protect the GBR, but as these corals appear resilient to conditions intensifying with climate change, they will hopefully provide the time and insights necessary to restore coral growth.

National Geographic Festival Delle Scienze

For more than forty years, through the Rolex Awards for Enterprise, Rolex has supported exceptional people who have the courage and conviction to face major challenges; men and women who have a spirit of initiative and who initiate extraordinary projects that make the world a better place.

MamaM!a

5 Australian women who are solving the biggest problems of climate change.  Here are just five women (four Aussies and one New Zealander) who are making serious scientific progress when it comes to addressing climate change.

Washington Post

In 2016, vast populations of coral reefs turned ghostly white. The incident was not confined to a single location; it swept across the world’s oceans like an unstoppable wave.  And the increasing frequency of their occurrence is one of the most dramatic visual indicators of the impact of climate change on living systems. Camp has plans to address it.

CNN – Call to Earth

With her scuba mask on, slowly diving beneath the surface of the water, Emma Camp encountered a world she had never experienced before: an underwater city of vivid color.  It was the first time she saw a coral reef – as a seven-year-old on holiday with her family in the Bahamas.

WhizzPopBang Magazine

Take a virtual dive beneath the ocean surface and find out all about awe-inspring coral reefs – find out how scuba diving equipment works, craft a 3D coral reef and much more.

UN Foundation

Nearly all coral reefs are projected to be lost with 2°C warming by the end of the century. Thankfully, there are scientists like Dr. Emma Camp working to stop this from happening. Dr. Camp is a coral biologist and marine bio-geochemist at the University of Technology Sydney.

Telegraph, U.K.

The biologist in a race against time to save the Great Barrier Reef.  Could pioneering research by a young marine biologist from Essex save the embattled Great Barrier Reef?  Guy Kelly meets her to find out.

Good Weekend Magazine, Sydney Morning Herald

‘Super survivor’ coral brings hope to beleaguered Great Barrier Reef.

The work of a young English marine biologist might help save the Great Barrier Reef – and the billions of dollars in tourist revenue it brings in.

United Nations High-Level Women in Power Event

Sydney Southern Courier

ALTHOUGH she may prefer investigating underwater, marine eco-geologist Emma Camp will have to come up for air after receiving international acclaim for her work. Dr Emma Camp, from Randwick, is just one of 17 people to be named a United Nations Young Leader.

2SER Breakfast

Marine biologist Dr Emma Camp was recently announced as a top 10 finalist in the global Rolex awards which provides several grants of up to $250,000 towards the participants research.

Emma’s research involves the study of corals and reefs with the Great Barrier Reef as the main focus.

Protecting reefs, empowering youth: Connect4Climate

Collection bag in hand, a GoPro on my head, and a shark-repelling cuff fastened to my ankle, I braved the ocean water to recover samples of some of the most resilient coral species on Earth. My name is Emma Camp, and preserving Earth’s reefs has long been my passion.

How I Sea –United Nations 2018

SDG Live: Coral Reefs and Climate Change

Marine biologist, young leader for the SDGs Emma F Camp speaks about saving coral reefs & the role of youth in combating climate change: “Make sure your voice is heard, put pressure on the government to take Climate Action”.

IWF Cornerstone Conference – Tidal Wave

IWF’s membership includes more than 7,000 diverse and accomplished women from 33 nations on six continents. We answer high-achieving women leaders’ need for a community of diverse thinkers. We are shaping a future in which leadership has no gender and the next generation is inspired and equipped to transform the world.